2021-2022 University Catalog 
    
    Oct 18, 2021  
2021-2022 University Catalog

Financial Aid



The Office of Financial Aid administers federal Title IV programs, including Pell Grant, Direct Loans, Parent Plus Loans, Graduate Plus Loans, and work study, as well as scholarships, Veterans Administration benefits, and private loan funding.

Federal Financial Aid

Federal Financial Aid consists of grants, work-study, and loans. Students interested in federal financial aid must complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The FAFSA must be completed each academic and/or award year in which the student requires financial assistance. More detailed information on eligibility or any of the types of federal funds can be found at http://studentaid.gov/. The federal funds are:

 

  • Federal Pell Grant
  • Federal Iraq and Afghanistan Service Grant
  • Federal Work-Study Program
  • Federal Direct Subsidized Loan
  • Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan
  • Federal Direct Unsubsidized Healthcare (HPPA) Loan (Doctor of Chiropractic students only)
  • Federal Direct PLUS Loan (for parents and graduate students)

Federal Pell Grant for Undergraduate Students

The Federal Pell Grant program provides financial assistance to eligible students attending approved post-high school institutions. Eligibility and actual amount of aid are determined by the U.S. Department of Education. It is a need-based program for undergraduates; no repayment is required. Eligible students must be enrolled in at least one credit hour. Grants are prorated for less than full-time enrollment.

Iraq and Afghanistan Service Grant

A student who is not eligible for a Pell Grant but whose parent or guardian was a member of the U.S. Armed Forces and died because of service performed in Iraq or Afghanistan after September 11, 2001 may be eligible to receive the Iraq and Afghanistan Service Grant. Students must be under 24 years old or must have been enrolled in college at least part-time at the time of the parent’s or guardian’s death. The grant award is equal to the amount of a maximum Pell Grant for the award year, not to exceed the cost of attendance for that award year.

Federal Work-Study Program

Federal Work-Study (FWS) is a federally and institutionally funded program that provides part-time jobs for enrolled undergraduate and graduate students with financial need, allowing students to earn money to help pay education expenses. Eligible students must be enrolled in at least one credit hour. In arranging a job and determining how many hours per week a student may work under this program, the student’s financial need, class schedule, and academic progress will be considered.

 

The University cannot guarantee a job for every student, although the Office of Financial Aid makes every effort to place every eligible student desiring work into a position. Employment renewal each year is not guaranteed. Employment may not exceed 20 hours per week during periods when school is in session or 40hours per week during breaks. Work during breaks must be pre-approved by the Office of Financial Aid and the supervisor. FWS employees are required to turn in the appropriate tax documents and payroll documentation to the Human Resources department prior to beginning work. FWS employees are also responsible for completing and turning in timesheets.

Federal Direct Subsidized Loan for Undergraduate Students

Federal Direct Subsidized Loans are loans for undergraduate students who demonstrate financial need, as determined by cost of attendance minus expected family contribution from the FAFSA, and other financial aid (such as grants or scholarships). A student must also be enrolled in school on at least a half-time basis to be eligible for these funds. Subsidized loans do not accrue interest while a student is in school at least half-time or during deferment periods. The interest rates are variable and subject to change each year. The subsidized loan amount may not exceed financial need or annual or aggregate loan limits established by the Department of Education. A loan fee is deducted from each disbursement and is subject to change. The Department of Education retains this amount as an origination fee, which reduces the cost of supporting low-interest loans. Payment begins six months after the student graduates, withdraws, or is enrolled in fewer than 6 credits.

 

First-time borrowers taking out a Direct subsidized loan on or after July 1, 2013 are subject to the 150% Direct Subsidized Loan Limit, which limits the amount of time a student is eligible to borrow subsidized loans to 150% of their published program length (for example, 6 years for a 4-year program). Once you reach the time limit, you are no longer eligible to receive additional Direct Subsidized loans and your outstanding loans will begin accruing interest. You may continue to receive Direct Unsubsidized loans if otherwise eligible.

Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan for Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loans are available to undergraduate and graduate students. The student is not required to demonstrate financial need to receive a Direct Unsubsidized Loan. Eligibility is determined by cost of attendance minus other financial aid (such as grants or scholarships). A student must also be enrolled at least half-time to be eligible for these funds.

 

Unlike a Subsidized loan, a student is responsible for the interest on the loan from the time the Unsubsidized loan is disbursed until it is paid in full. The student can pay interest while in school and during grace periods and deferment or forbearance periods or allow it to accrue and be capitalized (that is, added to the principal amount of the loan). If a student chooses not to pay the interest as it accrues, this will increase the total amount to be repaid because the student will be charged interest on a higher principal amount. The interest rates are variable and adjusted each year. A loan fee is deducted from each disbursement and is subject to change. The federal government retains this amount as an origination fee, which reduces the cost of supporting low-interest loans. Payment begins six months after the student graduates, withdraws, or is enrolled in fewer than 6 credits.

Graduate students in the Doctor of Chiropractic program are eligible for additional unsubsidized funds for health professionals, referred to as HPAA, in addition to the standard unsubsidized amount for graduate students. This loan has the same terms and repayment options as a traditional unsubsidized loan.

Federal Direct PLUS Loan for Parents of Undergraduate Students

Federal Direct Parent PLUS loans are available to a parent with satisfactory credit history that wants to borrow a loan to assist with paying for their dependent student’s education. The student is not required to demonstrate financial need to receive a Direct Parent PLUS Loan. Eligibility is determined by cost of attendance minus other financial aid (such as grants or scholarships). A student must also be enrolled at least half-time to be eligible for these funds. In addition, before a student can receive a Parent PLUS Loan, the school must have determined a student’s minimum eligibility for Direct Subsidized and/or Unsubsidized Direct Loans. If an applicant has adverse credit history, they have the option to appeal the credit decision or use an endorser. A student whose parent(s) is unable to secure a Direct Parent PLUS Loan may be eligible for an additional unsubsidized loan.

 

Direct Loans. If an applicant has adverse credit history, they have the option to appeal the credit decision or use an endorser. A student whose parent(s) is unable to secure a Direct Parent PLUS Loan may be eligible for an additional unsubsidized loan.

 

The first payment on a Parent PLUS Loan is due within 60 days after the final loan disbursement for each loan. The interest rates are variable and adjusted each year. A loan fee is deducted from each disbursement and is subject to change. The federal government retains this amount as an origination fee, which reduces the cost of supporting low-interest loans.

 

Federal Direct Graduate PLUS Loan for Graduate Students

Federal Direct Graduate PLUS loans are available to graduate and professional students with a satisfactory credit history and want to borrow additional loan funds to assist with paying for their educational expenses. The student is not required to demonstrate financial need to receive a Direct Graduate PLUS Loan.  Eligibility is determined by cost of attendance minus other financial aid (such as grants or scholarships). A student must also be enrolled at least half-time to be eligible for these funds. In addition, before a student can receive a Graduate PLUS Loan, the school must have determined a student’s minimum eligibility for Direct Unsubsidized Loans. Applicants with adverse credit histories have the option to appeal the credit decision or use an endorser.

The first payment on a Graduate PLUS Loan is due within 60 days after the final loan disbursement for each loan. The interest rates are variable and adjusted each year. A loan fee is deducted from each disbursement and is subject to change. The federal government retains this amount as an origination fee, which reduces the cost of supporting low-interest loans.

 

Institutional Scholarships

Institutional scholarships are scholarships funded through the University. Scholarships and award amounts vary from year to year. Current scholarship information can be found on the University’s website.

 

External Scholarships and Grants

External Scholarships are available through external sources such as local churches, clubs, professional organizations, private foundations and civic groups. Students are responsible for obtaining external scholarships.

 

Military Educational Assistance Programs

Military educational benefits assist veterans, active-duty personnel, and eligible dependents with costs associated with attending college. Any prospective students that meet these criteria are encouraged to take full advantage of benefits available through the Veterans Administration (VA). Those students eligible for benefits should apply for Admissions to the University and complete the Admissions process. An application for VA Education Benefits should be completed with the VA prior to entering the institution and a copy of a Certificate of Enrollment (COE) provided to the Office of Financial Aid prior to beginning classes. For active students wishing to utilize benefits while on active duty, please contact the Office of Student Accounts.

 

Other Resources/Estimated Financial Assistance

 

If a portion of a student’s cost of attendance is waived or paid by source other than federal financial aid, this is considered other resources. Students are required to disclose financial assistance that will be paid by a third party on their behalf. Examples of other resources include, but are not limited to, the following:

 

  • External grants and scholarships
  • University grants and scholarships
  • Tuition assistance
  • Military tuition benefits
  • University tuition discounts and waivers
  • University administration tuition and/or student account adjustments
  • Income from insurance programs that pay for the student’s education
  • Private loans
  • Private and state grants
  • Tribal aid
  • Other financial assistance paid directly to the University

 

 Cost of Attendance and Estimated Family Contribution

 

Financial need is used to determine financial aid eligibility for need-based aid. Students must have financial need to receive federal financial aid funds, except for Direct Unsubsidized and PLUS Loans under the Direct Loans program.

 

  • Financial need is the difference between the Cost of Attendance and the Expected Family Contribution.
  • Cost of Attendance is the average cost for a student to attend for the academic year. The Cost of Attendance includes allowances for tuition, fees, transportation, books, supplies, room and board, and miscellaneous expenses.
  • The Expected Family Contribution is based upon the information the student and/or their family have provided on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The Expected Family Contribution is the dollar amount the Federal government has determined that a student is expected to contribute toward their own educational costs for the academic year.
  • A student’s Expected Family Contribution and other resources will be subtracted from the cost of attendance when determining eligibility for federal financial aid (Title IV). All awards, including need and non-need-based aid, cannot exceed a student’s annual cost of attendance.
  • If the University receives additional other resources that cause the student to exceed the cost of attendance, it will adjust the awards appropriately to eliminate the over-award. This may include reducing future disbursements for a second or subsequent payment period or returning awards to the funding source. Funds will be returned in the order most beneficial to the student.

 

Financial Aid Eligibility

 

Federal financial aid recipients must meet the following requirements:

 

  • Be a U.S. citizen, permanent resident, or eligible non-citizen
  • Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)
  • Have a valid social security number
  • Be registered with Selective Service, if you are male (you must register between the ages of 18 and 25) and not a current member of the active armed service
  • Have a high school diploma or General Education Development (GED) certificate
  • Be admitted to the University as a degree- or certificate-seeking student
  • Be enrolled in good standing with at least half-time enrollment status to be eligible for Direct Loan Program funds
  • Maintain satisfactory academic progress as described elsewhere in this catalog
  • Not in default on any Title IV loan or owe repayment on any Title IV grant or loan received at any school
  • Agree to use federal student aid for educational purposes only
  • Provide all requested documentation necessary to process aid*

 

* Federal regulations mandate that a school has a system of identifying and resolving discrepancies in all FSA-related information received. A school must resolve discrepancies for all students, not just those selected for verification. Resolution includes determining what information is correct and documenting the school’s finding in the student’s file. Conflicting information must be resolved before disbursing aid or making a professional judgment adjustment. If conflicting information arises after a student’s aid was originally disbursed, the school may remove any disbursements of aid from a student’s account and require resolution of any conflicting information before disbursing any further aid. If this occurs, the student may be responsible for any balances owed to the University as a result of receiving aid that he/she wasn’t eligible for based on the conflicting information. 

 

Additional Eligibility Considerations

 

Students should also be aware of the following information regarding financial aid eligibility:
 

  • Federal regulations require that financial aid funds be used to pay only for coursework that is required toward the completion of the student’s official program of study on record in the Office of the Registrar. A student is expected to know and understand his/her degree requirements. If a student takes a class that does not meet degree requirements, the student is required to repay all or a portion of the financial aid received while taking ineligible coursework.
  • Financial aid recipients must maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP). Students who do not meet SAP standards are not eligible for financial aid, with the exception of those students in Financial Aid Warning, Financial Aid Probation, or who have an SAP appeal-approved status as described in the Satisfactory Academic Progress policy described elsewhere in this catalog.
  • Financial aid recipients enrolled at two or more colleges/universities at the same time cannot receive duplicate federal financial aid at both schools.
  • Students must be attending at least half-time in courses applicable toward their major to be eligible for a student loan.
  • Students receive aid based upon their enrollment status at the end of the add/drop period, typically referred to as census. If a student adjusts their schedule during the add/drop period, their financial aid may be impacted.
  • Students who have met the requirements to complete their certificate or degree are no longer eligible for financial aid.
  • Students who re-enroll or are readmitted to the University for any reason must meet financial aid eligibility including Satisfactory Academic Progress requirements.

 

There may be additional eligibility considerations. Students are encouraged to visit mySCU, the University’s intranet, for additional information on financial aid requirements, procedures, announcements, and processes.

Steps to Apply for Financial Aid

Prospective students may apply for financial aid before being officially admitted; financial aid will not be awarded until the student is officially admitted. Continuing students must reapply for financial aid annually. To do so, students must:

 

  • Electronically submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) at http://www.studentaid.gov before the deadline. This initiates the financial aid process and determines aid amounts. Include the School Code: 001229. Note: It may take up to five business days for SCU to receive FAFSA data from the Department of Education.
  • Check the Financial Aid (FA) Portal frequently, available on mySCU, the University’s intranet. Make sure that the FA Portal account is active and that you respond to any request for verification/documentation. If additional information is needed to process financial aid, students will be notified via the FA Portal. Financial aid cannot be awarded until a student’s financial aid file is complete, which means all requested documentation is submitted and accepted by the Office of Financial Aid. Note: It can take up to four weeks after all required documentation is received to award the student aid.

 

Note: Financial aid does not transfer from one school to another. Transfer student or students that have recently attended another school must cancel all pending loans or grants from the school last attended. Notify the Office of Financial Aid that loans and grants have been canceled.

 

Note: Aid will not show as canceled until the previous school reports the cancellation to the Department of Education. The University cannot proceed with processing until aid shows fully canceled. 

 

Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) Policy

Federal regulations, HEA Sec. 484(c) §668.16, 668.34, require institutions participating in Title IV federal financial aid programs to develop academic progress standards and review student records to ensure they are complying with these standards and making adequate progress toward their academic goals.

 

The Office of Financial Aid reviews SAP each term or payment period. Students who do not meet the minimum SAP standards are not eligible for financial aid, unless they have been granted a Financial Aid Warning, Financial Aid Probation, or a Financial Aid Approved Appeal with an Academic Progress Plan, as described below. The Financial Aid SAP policy should not be confused with academic policies described elsewhere in the catalog.

 

Failure to maintain SAP will result in the loss of all federal aid, including:

  • Federal Pell Grant
  • Federal Work-Study Program
  • Federal Direct Subsidized Loan
  • Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan
  • Federal Direct Unsubsidized Healthcare Loan (Doctor of Chiropractic students only)
  • Federal Direct PLUS Loan (for parents and graduate students)
  • Other Grant and/or Scholarship programs which require Satisfactory Academic Progress verification

SAP Evaluation Components

SCU’s satisfactory academic progress evaluation includes the following three components:

  • Pace of Progression (Quantitative Standard/Time-based): Students must successfully complete at least 67% of the cumulative credits attempted. 
    • Grades that count negatively against pace of progression: F, W, WF, and NP.
    • Grades that count positively toward pace of progression: A, B, C, D, P, and TR.
    • Repeated courses count toward credits attempted as indicated below:
      • Credit hour programs: All repeated courses will be included in the Pace of Progression calculation. Students may only receive Title IV Aid for one repeat of a previously passed course.
      • Clock hour programs: Students in a non-term clock-hour program are not eligible for any additional aid to repeat coursework.
  • The following grades are not used to calculate pace of progression: MW, WV, and AU. 

 

  • Grade Point Average (Qualitative Standard/Grade-based): Students are required to maintain a minimum 2.0 cumulative GPA in all programs other than the Master of Science: Physician Assistant. Students enrolled in the Master of Science: Physician Assistant are required to maintain a minimum 2.75 cumulative GPA.
    • Grades that count toward the GPA standard include all credits earned at SCU that count toward the completion of a student’s certificate or degree for which quality points may be assigned: A, B, C, D, F, WF, and NP. 
    • Grades that do not count toward your GPA include: W, TR, AU, P, MW, and WV.

 

  • Maximum Timeframe (Quantitative Standards/Time-based): Students must complete their program of study within 150% of the average length of the program. For example, for a bachelor program requiring 120 credit hours, a student may attempt a maximum of 180 credit hours before becoming ineligible for financial aid (120 x 150% = 180 credit hours).
    • All courses attempted at SCU that count towards the completion of a student’s certificate or degree count toward the maximum timeframe calculation, except for courses with an AU or MW grade.
    • Transfer credit (TR grades) are included as attempted and earned credits in determining maximum timeframe.
    • If at any point the University determines that it is mathematically impossible for a student to complete the clock hours or degree requirements within the maximum time to complete the program, the student becomes ineligible to receive financial aid.

 

 

Financial Aid Warning

Students who do not meet Satisfactory Academic Progress requirements are placed on Financial Aid Warning.

 

  • Students who fail to maintain the minimum GPA are given a grace period of one academic term, during which they can continue to receive financial aid. This period is referred to as a Financial Aid Warning Period. At the end of the warning term, if the cumulative GPA requirements are not met, the student will be suspended from receiving their financial aid until they bring their cumulative GPA back up to a 2.0 or better.
  • Students who fail to maintain the required SAP pace of progression standards will be given a grace period of one academic term. This period is referred to as a Financial Aid Warning Period. Students who fail to complete their program within 150% of the published program length may continue in their programs, however, they are suspended from receiving future Title IV financial aid. A student may also become ineligible to continue receiving financial aid if it becomes mathematically impossible for him/her to complete their program within 150% of the specific published length of the program.

 

A student can receive financial aid for one term while on Financial Aid Warning. Students are notified via their SCU email when placed on Financial Aid Warning. Financial Aid Warning cannot be appealed. Students must meet the SAP requirements at the end of the subsequent evaluation period or financial aid eligibility will be suspended. Students may only be placed on Financial Aid Warning if they were meeting the SAP standards for the immediately preceding term.

 

Financial Aid Probation

Students may be placed on Financial Aid Probation after successfully appealing a Financial Aid Suspension.  Financial Aid Probation is limited to one term. A student who fails to meet minimum SAP standards at the end of their Financial Aid Probation term will be disqualified (suspended) from receiving financial aid.

 

Financial Aid Approved Appeal with Academic Progress Plan

Students who fail to meet SAP after their Financial Warning Period will be disqualified (suspended) from receiving future financial aid. If a student has documented mitigating circumstances to show why academic progress could not be made in prior terms and an appeal is successfully approved, the student can regain eligibility for financial aid with a Financial Aid Academic Progress Plan. A Financial Aid Academic Progress Plan is typically used when a student cannot get back to minimum SAP standards in one term.

 

Please note: The Financial Aid Academic Progress Plan may vary from an academic progress plan established with the Dean or Chair of a particular program. A student will be monitored to the conditions of the Financial Aid Academic Progress Plan for the number of terms indicated in the plan. Students who fail to meet the conditions of their financial aid academic progress plan will be disqualified (suspended) from receiving financial aid.

Financial Aid Suspension

Students who fail to meet SAP after their Financial Warning Period will be disqualified (suspended) from receiving future financial aid. Financial Aid suspension occurs when a student has failed to maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress. When financial aid is suspended, students are no longer eligible for aid until they are meeting the terms of satisfactory academic progress or have an approved financial aid appeal.

 

Students on financial aid suspension are ineligible for aid.

SAP Appeals (Appeal of Financial Aid Suspension)

Students who lose their financial aid eligibility may appeal based on mitigating circumstances. Mitigating circumstances are defined as unanticipated and unavoidable events or situations beyond a student’s control that prevented them from successfully completing courses or meeting the terms of a prior appeal.

 

Examples of acceptable mitigating circumstances could include but are not limited to:

 

  • serious accident or illness of the student
  • serious illness or death of immediate family member (parents, grandparents, siblings, spouse, children)
  • unexpected financial obligations

Satisfactory Progress Appeal Process

Any student whose aid has been suspended due to failure of maintaining SAP may request an appeal of the determination. All appeal requests must be submitted to the Financial Aid Office no later than Week 1 of the term following the suspension notification.

 

The student must submit a Satisfactory Academic Progress Appeal form, along with any supporting documentation, via mySCU, the University’s intranet. In the SAP Appeal Form, the following must be included:

 

  • A detailed explanation as to why he/she failed to make satisfactory progress (mitigating circumstances).
  • A detailed explanation of what has changed in his/her situation that will allow him/her to make satisfactory progress at the next evaluation period.
  • Supporting documentation supporting the extenuating circumstances such as letters from doctors, therapists, police reports, etc.
  • Please note: A meeting with the Director of Financial Aid may also be required before the appeal decision is rendered. 

 

Appeal approval is determined on a case-by-case basis and is not guaranteed. All SAP appeal decisions are final. The Director of Financial Aid will deny or grant appeals within two weeks of the term following the suspension notification, or one week after the deadline for filing the appeal.

 

Students who have their Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) appeal request approved will be allowed to have their financial aid reinstated for one term. During the reinstatement term, the student will be placed on a Financial Aid Warning status. If it is determined that at any time during the Financial Aid Warning period that a student cannot successfully fulfill the warning requirements, he/she will be suspended from receiving financial aid.

 

If the student is suspended from receiving federal aid, he/she may choose to apply for a private alternative loan.

Financial Counseling

In some cases, the Director may require that a student receive financial counseling prior to reinstating financial aid eligibility or while on Financial Aid Warning.

 

Return of Title IV Funds (R2T4)

The University is required to determine the amount of Title IV program assistance that a student earns when withdrawing. The Title IV programs covered by this requirement include: Federal Pell Grants, Direct Loans, and Direct PLUS Loans.

 

When a student withdraws during a payment period, the amount of Title IV program assistance earned is determined by a specific formula. If less assistance than the amount earned has been received, students may be able to receive those additional funds. If more assistance than the amount earned has been received, the excess funds must be returned.

 

The amount of assistance earned is determined on a prorated basis. For example, if a student who has completed 30% of the term by days attended or clock hours scheduled earns 30% of the assistance originally scheduled to receive-a student that has completed more than 60% of the term is considered to have earned 100% of the assistance for that period.

 

A student who did not receive all of the funds earned may be due a post-withdrawal disbursement. If the post-withdrawal disbursement includes loan funds, the Office of Financial Aid staff must get the student’s permission before a disbursement can be made. A student may choose to decline some or all of the loan funds. All or a portion of post-withdrawal disbursement (including loan funds) may automatically be used to satisfy outstanding tuition and fees. For all other school charges, the student’s permission is required to use the post-withdrawal disbursement toward those charges. If a student does not give permission, funds will be disbursed directly to the student. However, it may be in the student’s best interest to allow the University to keep the funds to reduce the debt owed to the University.

 

The Office of Financial Aid staff must also get the student’s permission before disbursing any Title IV grant funds that are part of a post-withdrawal disbursement directly to the student. If the student, parent or the University, on the student’s behalf, received excess Title IV program funds that must be returned, the University must return a portion of the excess equal to the lesser of:

 

  1. Institutional charges multiplied by the unearned percentage of funds, or
  2. The entire amount of excess funds

 

The University must return this amount even if it didn’t keep this amount of the student’s Title IV program funds. If the University is not required to return all of the excess funds, the student must return the remaining amount. Loan funds must be returned in accordance with the terms of the promissory note. That is, the student must make scheduled payments to the holder of the loan over a period of time.

 

Any amount of unearned grant funds that you must return is called an overpayment. The amount of grant overpayment due from a student is limited to 50% of the grant funds received or scheduled for the term. In addition, a student does not have to repay a grant overpayment of $50.00 or less. A student must make arrangements with the University or the Department of Education to return the unearned grant funds.

 

The requirements for Title IV program funds when a student withdraws are separate from the University tuition refund policy. Therefore, a student may still owe funds to the school to cover unpaid institutional charges. The University may charge a student for any Title IV program funds that the school was required to return. When SCU is required to return tuition revenue to Title IV program, students will owe the University this amount. Registration activity may also be blocked until this debt is paid. Unpaid debts may be referred for collection activity and additional fees may be added.

 

 

The financial aid Return of Title IV Funds (R2T4) is followed for all federal aid recipients. The following factors impact Return of Title IV Funds:

 

  • Students who receive federal financial aid are subject to the Return of Title IV Policy.
  • Students who withdraw or complete zero credits for the period of enrollment for which they have been charged tuition and received financial aid may have to repay a portion of the grants and/or loans they received in addition to any tuition the University returns to the financial aid programs as a result of the withdrawal.
  • If it is determined, at any point, that a student never attended a course/courses in a term where financial aid was received, the student will be required to repay all funds received.
  • Students who remain enrolled greater than 60% of the payment period are considered to have earned 100% of the aid received and will not owe a Return of Title IV Funds.
  • If a student completes at least one course they will be subject to the Satisfactory Academic Progress policy, rather than the Return of Title IV Funds policy.
  • This policy does not apply to work-study earnings received.

 

Determining Date of Withdrawal

The date of withdrawal used to determine whether a student owes a repayment of financial aid funds, and the amount of repayment, is determined as follows:

 

  • The date the student began the institution’s withdrawal process or officially notified the institution in writing of an intent to withdraw by completing the Official Withdrawal Form and submitting it to the Office of the Registrar.

 

OR

 

  • If a student did not officially withdraw or notify the institution of the intent to withdraw, referred to as an unofficial withdrawal, the last date of attendance is determined by the latest date of attendance provided by the faculty member(s). Unofficial withdrawals are determined within 30 days after the end of a term/payment period.

 

In the case of unofficial withdrawals, a date of determination is established and used. The date of determination is the date the institution determined the student ceased attendance at the school. This date becomes important when processing any repayment of aid amount owed by a student and school.     

Determining Repayment Amount

There are six steps in the formula for calculating the amount of funds that must be returned to the financial aid programs:

 

  1. Determine the date of withdrawal and last date of attendance using attendance records and/or the Official Withdrawal Form from the Office of the Registrar within 30 days after the end of a term/payment period
  2. Determine the percentage of the term/payment period attended by the student using the number of calendar days completed through the date of withdrawal divided by the number of calendar days in the term or payment period less any breaks of five calendar days or less
  3. Calculate the amount of financial aid earned by the student
  4. Compare amount earned and amounts disbursed/could have been disbursed to determine amount unearned
  5. If amount of aid earned is greater than amount disbursed, determine late/post-withdrawal disbursement amount that can be offered to the student and notify the student within 30 days of the date of determination of the withdrawal date of this award
  6. If amount of aid earned is less than amount disbursed, determine the amount of financial aid that must be returned and return the school- owed funds within 45 days of the date of determination of the withdrawal date

 

Both the University and the student have specific responsibilities under this policy. Students who owe a repayment due to the Return of Title IV Policy must pay that obligation/debt before regaining eligibility for additional assistance. Students may be unable to register for future terms until the obligation/debt is satisfied.

Veterans Administration (VA) Benefits

SCU accepts Vocational Rehabilitation (Chapter 31), Montgomery GI Bill (Chapter 30), and Post-9/11 GI Bill (Chapter 33) VA benefits. GI Montgomery Bill and Post-9/11 GI Bill VA benefits can only be used in the Doctor of Chiropractic program. Vocational Rehabilitation can be used based on the approval of your Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor.

To apply for VA benefits at SCU, the following documents must be submitted to the Office of Financial Aid:

 

  • Copy of the DD Form 214 (Certificate of Release of Discharge from Active Duty, or “DD214”)
  • Copy of the Certificate of Eligibility (COE) Letter from VA
  • Yellow Ribbon Certification Request Form (if applicable)
  • VA Benefits Certification Request Form

 

The condition of payment by the Veterans Administration of Educational Benefits is based upon attendance and maintaining Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP). Veterans not meeting SAP after two terms will be disqualified and VA benefits will be terminated.

Southern California University of Health Sciences does not participate in advanced payment with the VA.

Yellow Ribbon Program

The University is a participant in the Post-9/11 GI Bill Yellow Ribbon Program. The Yellow Ribbon Program payment is paid directly to the University on behalf of the student. The VA matches each dollar that SCU contributes up to 100% of the difference between tuition and fees charged to the student. The combined school and VA contribution cannot exceed tuition and fees charged to the student.

 

The following individuals are eligible for the Yellow Ribbon Program:

  • Only individuals entitled at the 100% benefit level (or their dependents using transferred entitlement) may receive Yellow Ribbon funding
  • Students who served at least 36 months or more on active duty, and
  • Students who served at least 30 continuous days on active duty, and were discharged due to service-connected disability

 

The following individuals are not eligible for the Yellow Ribbon Program:

  • Active-Duty personnel
  • Spouses of Active-Duty personnel using Transferred Entitlement
  • Fry Scholarship recipients

 

If you are eligible, SCU will make the additional funds available for your education program without an additional charge to your GI Bill entitlement. Only veterans entitled to the maximum benefit rate under the Post-9/11 GI Bill may receive this funding.

 

Examples of unacceptable mitigating circumstances include but are not limited to:

 

  • withdrawal to avoid a failing grade
  • too many courses attempted
  • voluntary change of program or major
  • limited number of tests/assignments
  • disagreement with instructor
  • voluntary change in work hours
  • being out of school for a number of years
  • incarceration

 

Approval of all appeals is determined on a case-by-case basis and is not guaranteed. Multiple appeals for the same circumstances are generally not considered.